Watch Vasyl Lomachenko Vs. T.J Dillashaw Full 7 Minute Sparring Session.

    

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Ukrainian Boxing superstar Vasyl Lomachenko brought in former UFC bantamweight Champion T.J Dillashaw to his camp for his fight with Jason Sousa. Dillashaw is known as sort of a Lomachenko style fighter in the MMA world because of his use of amazing footwork, feints and head movements. The two champions spent countless rounds in the ring sparring hard while cameras filmed, now the full sparring sessions have been released to the public.

VIDEO AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE:

   

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Vasyl Anatoliyovich Lomachenko (Ukrainian: Василь Анатолійович Ломаченко, IPA: [βɐˈsɪlʲ lomɐˈtʃɛnko]; born 17 February 1988) is a Ukrainian professional boxer.[3] He has held the WBO super featherweight title since 2016, and previously the WBO featherweight title from 2014 to 2016; having won the latter title in his third professional fight. Lomachenko is known for his exceptional hand speed, timing, accuracy, creativity, athleticism, and footwork. He is one of the most successful amateur boxers of all time, possessing a record of 396 wins and 1 loss, with his only loss avenged twice.[4] Competing in the featherweight and lightweight divisions, he won a silver medal at the 2007 World Championships, gold at the 2008 European Championships, consecutive gold at the 2008 and 2012 Olympics, and consecutive gold at the 2009 and 2011 World Championships.

   

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As of January 2018, Lomachenko is ranked as the world’s best active boxer, pound for pound, by ESPN;[5] second by the Transnational Boxing Rankings Board;[6] and third by The Ring magazine[7] and BoxRec.[8] He is also ranked by all four as the world’s best active super featherweight. The Ring named Lomachenko as their Prospect of the Year in 2013. CBS Sports named him Boxer of the Year in 2016, while HBO Sports named him Boxer of the Year in 2016 and in 2017.[12][13] The Boxing Writers Association of America and The Ring named him Fighter of the Year in 2017.

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Lomachenko was coached by his father Anatoly from a young age. He claims that if his father had not been a boxing coach he probably would have chosen to play ice hockey professionally.[3] According to Bob Arum in 2017, Lomachenko’s father did not let him train for boxing until he attended ballet classes. He then went on to gymnastics before finally getting into the ring. At the World Championships 2007 in Chicago he beat Abner Cotto in the first round, Theodoros Papazov, Arturo Santos Reyes, and Li Yang in the semifinal to reach a fight against Russian favorite Albert Selimov, another southpaw, to whom he lost, 11:16.

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Lomachenko won gold at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing, China. He avenged his 2007 World Championship defeat by Selimov in the first round. Lomachenko beat his five opponents by an astonishing 58–13 on the way to his first gold medal, and was subsequently named the outstanding boxer for the tournament and awarded the Val Barker Trophy. In 2012 London Olympics he won his second consecutive Gold Medal. He defeated Han Soon-Chul of South Korea in the final by 19–9. Lomachenko finished his amateur career with an impressive career record of 396 wins and only one loss, to Albert Selimov, which was avenged twice.